Carnegiea

Literary Magazine

Submit to our Winter Webzine

We are still taking submissions for our Winter Webzine! What better way to end 2020 than to recap all of the great work local artists have done throughout the year? We’re looking for any and all types of art – poetry, photography, music, essays, conceptual plays, textiles, creative political commentary, and anything else you can think of!

Submission form: https://forms.gle/9Km1Bhb5H7jMEPr77

More information about submitting: https://carnegiealitmag.com/submit/

 

Photoset from Saguaro National Park

By Ashley McQueen

I recently had taken these photographs at Saguaro National Park West to capture the beauty of the cacti and plants during one of Tucson’s famous sunsets. Saguaro National Park is such a classic spot for Tucson natives and out of town visitors to experience. I wanted to capture its beauty to share with the rest of Tucson who have not been able to experience it yet. Creating and photographing images of my hometown means so much to me because it is the one place I have known forever and what it has to offer is so special and important.

Firewood

By Kaya Callahan

I am the wood to his fire
When he speaks his words keep me warm
But when he yells his words burn me
Blacken me.
Break me apart from the inside out.
Have me question my worth.
Crack. Crack. Crackling.
Until he would soothe me with his warming words again.
But this dark pain, charcoal stained spots on my heart and mind
Never truly go away.

“Firewood” is about how my ex boyfriend would go from loving to being emotionally/ verbally abusive. Even after he would briefly apologize and be “loving” again his words still stuck with me.

Untitled

By Lia Christensen

It’s What I Deserve

By Humberto Valdez

My hands have no flesh, not even bone.
Texture and sensation are no longer present in my fingertips.
My hands have been chopped off by life itself,
only severed wounds and nothingness remain.
The universe figured they were of no use to me nor anybody else.
They were a gift I was given and chose to neglect;
a waste of space.
How selfish I was, to ignore a blessing simply because I was too afraid.

Had only there been somebody to use them,
to put them to work like a mother.
A mother who caresses her baby’s cheek.
One who cares for her child, not because she needs to,
but because she desperately wants to.

I wish I could know how other people feel.
What is it like to caress somebody, or even to be caressed?
It doesn’t matter,
I don’t want somebody to tell me what it feels like,
I want to experience it for myself.
But, I guess I’ll never know.

For now, in this life, I shall be useless,
left alone to rot and bleed to death.
Well, maybe not bleed to death,
but to die of neglect.

I think that a lot of us teenagers feel that we won’t fall in love, and this is kind of how I would describe that feeling, by having your hands chopped off. Because, when you think of having a partner, you imagine touching them, holding their hand, running your hands through their hair, and without your hands, you can’t do any of that. It might possibly be the worst punishment in a sense, but if you keep this mindset, you almost feel that it’s what you deserve.

Winter Webzine

Update: Check out the completed Winter Webzine here!

Hey everyone, we are very excited to announce our Winter Webzine! We will be taking submissions through the end of December and hope to release it (for free) in late January right here on Carnegiea Lit Mag!

While the theme is Winter, we are taking any submissions. Our webzine is a chance for Southern Arizona’s talented artists to express their voices through their work. We are constantly impressed with the work we receive, and we’d like to see what else you’ve got!

Submission form: https://forms.gle/9Km1Bhb5H7jMEPr77

More information about submitting: https://carnegiealitmag.com/submit/

euphoric

By Lily Morales

Butterfly Girl

By Karen Jacquez

I created an insane amount of things during quarantine. I painted, sketched, did portraits, landscapes, etc. But near the end of quarantine I discovered a new style to draw in that came so naturally to me. This was the first piece created in this new style of mine and I fell in love with everything about it. I really wanted to experiment with the way unnatural colors can show different dimensions in a persons face.

No Justice No Peace

By Lily Morales

from the blm rally at the u of a campus

Imaginary Friend

By Ava Galbraith

Caught. 

“I got you!” Cindy Johnson was ecstatic; Tally Kent’s red-stained white shoes were visible from across the room. She was crouching in the smallest, darkest space she could find. 

“Darling, who did you catch?” Mrs. Johnson stepped into the outdated, sparsely decorated family room holding freshly bleached sheets. The blood splotches were still visible to Tally and she shied further into the space between the over-used liquor cabinet and the wall. 

Cindy glanced over her shoulder and grinned at her all-too-mechanical mother and pointed to an empty corner.  

Ava Galbraith is fascinated by unexpected turns in stories, particularly the reveal of villains. She dives deep into characters’ psyches and uses stream of consciousness to tell stories. Her work has been published in Ripples In Space podcast, The Dewdrop, Finding the Birds, San Joaquin Review, Open: Arts & Literary Magazine, and Voyage. When not developing intriguing flash fiction, she competes in equestrian show jumping and enjoys emerging herself in foreign cultures.

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